Workers’ Compensation In Minnesota

Workers’ compensation benefits are laws that are dedicated to providing money and medical benefits to an employee who has an injury as a result of an accident, injury or occupational disease incurred at work. The laws are specifically designed to protect workers and their dependents against the hardships from injury or death arising out of the work environment. The Worker’s Compensation laws benefit both the employee and employer. The employee receives money and medical benefits in exchange for forfeiting the common law right to...

Lastest WHO – World Health Organization News

History of Medicine a014801 Image by Children’s Bureau Centennial Collection: Images from the History of Medicine (NLM) Title: [Nurses weighing a baby] Subject (Keyword): Nursing Subject (Keyword): Children care & hygiene Appears In: Archives, 1894-1952, box 1. Copyright Statement: Literary rights to the unpublished material have been dedicated to the public. Order No.: A014801 Physical Description: 1 photoprint. Image Description: A nurse weighs an infant while other children sit nearby. Restrictions on Access: HMD provides...

Lastest American Association Of Clinical Endocrinologists News

Senator Stabenow meets with representatives of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Image by Senator Stabenow Photo provided by the office of U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow.

Yes, Deal Better With The Issues But Don’t Get Sidelined From More Costly, Needed Health

A contentious cloud hangs over the health care reform debate. Medical malpractice costs are a flash point for physicians and malpractice trial lawyers, each side claiming their solutions must be heeded to avoid potential disaster for patients and our health care delivery system. I believe the issue is a distraction, but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be addressed. The topic obstructs discussion of the higher impact reforms we need to tackle. It’s out there, like a sore thumb, so I’d like to walk through some of the...

Will Companies Drop Health Coverage Because Of Obamacare?

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, policy experts have debated that very question. Thomas Buchmueller, a business economics professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School, and colleagues looked at theoretical and empirical evidence to put that question in context in a paper published today in the September issue of Health Affairs. Buchmueller and co-authors Colleen Carey, a postdoctoral fellow in the School of Public Health, and Helen Levy, a professor with the Institute for Social Research and the Ford School...